Research and Clinical Trials


The Cardiovascular Research Institute at Fletcher Allen/University of Vermont is dedicated to reducing and preventing death and illness related to heart and vascular diseases.

Joining Clinical and Academic Strengths

The Institute joins together the clinical expertise and state-of-the-art facilities of Fletcher Allen with the academic strengths and scientific resources of the University of Vermont to study all facets of cardiovascular disease – from the bench to the bedside to the community.

National Leaders

Nationally and internationally known scientists and clinicians at the Institute are leaders in cardiac research at a national level, helping to advance treatments and therapies that will have a significant impact on public health.

Sub-specialty areas of focus include cardiovascular imaging with magnetic resonance and positron tomography; cell imaging; thrombosis, fibrinolysis and platelet biology; pharmacology; myocardial biology and vascular biology.

Drug-Eluting Stent Trials

Fletcher Allen and the University of Vermont are active participants in studies of new drug-eluting stents that use the latest advances in technology to improve outcomes for patients. A drug-eluting stent is a normal metal stent coated with a drug that prevents a blockage from recurring.

RESOLUTE Trial

Harold Dauerman, M.D., director of Fletcher Allen’s Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, is principal investigator at Fletcher Allen/UVM for the RESOLUTE trial, an international multi-center study sponsored by Medtronic.  The trial is studying the performance of the RESOLUTE drug-eluting stent, which uses a special polymer designed to extend the duration of drug exposure in the patient’s blood vessel.

SPIRIT PRIME Trial

Dr. Dauerman is also the lead investigator at Fletcher Allen/UVM for the SPIRIT PRIME trial, an Abbott Laboratories clinical trial looking at its XIENCE PRIME drug-eluting stent system. The new stent is designed for greater flexibility with the potential to help simplify procedures in complex cases.