New and Updated Topics

What's New in the Healthwise® Knowledgebase

Version 10.0

January 2014

What's New

  • New Health and Disease Topics
  • New Learning Centers
  • Enhanced Content
  • New NCI Topics
  • New Medication Topics
  • New Aisle 7 (CAM) Content
  • Updated Actionsets
  • Updated Decision Points
  • Updated Health and Disease Topics
  • Updated Illustrations, iTools, and Online Forms
  • Updated Medical Test Topics
  • Updated Symptom Topics
  • Updated NCI Topics
  • Updated Medication Topics
  • Topic Title Changes and Topic Replacements
  • Medical Guideline Reviews
  • What's Next

New Health and Disease Topics

  • Aggression in Youth: This new topic explores aggression that causes problems for youth at home and at school. In the most severe cases, it can lead to conduct disorder and trouble with the law. The topic explains when aggression is normal in youth and when it is out of control. It includes information on when to call a doctor.
  • Carotid Artery Disease: This new topic explains hardening of the arteries in the neck and how it increases the risk of stroke. The topic also discusses cause, symptoms, exams, and treatments.
  • Chemo Brain: This new topic covers a side effect of chemotherapy that causes problems with thinking and memory. The topic offers tips for helping people cope with foggy thinking and memory problems.
  • How to Teach Your Child by Example: This new topic uses a motivational interviewing approach to help parents think through what they do and don't want to role model for their children. And it offers tips to help parents and their children talk about good and bad choices.
  • Lung Cancer Screening: This new topic explains who should consider having annual low-dose CT scans for lung cancer.
  • Making a Change That Matters: This new suite of topics offers guidance for making a health-related change in your life, such as eating differently, quitting smoking, or stopping drinking or drug use. Each topic uses a motivational interviewing approach to help the user move to the next step of readiness for change.
  • Pityriasis Alba: This new topic describes this common skin disease in children and explains that it most often goes away without treatment.
  • Staying Safe When You Take Several Medicines: This new topic offers tips for avoiding the problems that can arise when you take several medicines.

New Learning Centers

Healthwise is pleased to introduce Learning Centers, searchable Web pages that link to detailed information about specific health concerns.

Enhanced Content

The following documents have been revised to help readers focus on the key points for the specific health issue. We have also verified that the content is written in plain language and is at or below a 6th- to 8th-grade reading level.

  • Cervical Cancer Screening: This topic has been reorganized to include screening guidelines by age. It also includes how often to have tests. It explains what the results mean. The topic now stresses the guideline that most women should have Pap tests and HPV tests at the same time.
  • Common Types of Hernias: This topic now includes the term "abdominal hernia."
  • Protecting Your Skin From the Sun: The topic now says that sun protection is important regardless of skin color.
  • Razor Bumps: This topic now includes the term "ingrown hairs." It has been updated so that it applies to shaving anywhere on the body.
  • Retinal Imaging: This topic, which used to be called Eye Angiogram, now covers other retinal imaging tests as well, including optical coherence tomography (OCT) and eye ultrasounds.
  • Click here to view an Actionset. Sleeping Problems: Dealing With Jet Lag: The introduction to this Actionset has been changed to make the example of jet lag more inclusive.
  • Sunburn: The topic now says that sun protection is important regardless of skin color.

Other Enhancements

  • The Other Places to Get Help section of the Healthwise Knowledgebase has a new look. We now offer a more streamlined list of one or two organizations and their Web addresses. We have removed extra data that was no longer useful or relevant. This change comes after careful consideration of how people use the Internet and of our own usage statistics. Our criteria for evaluating and including reputable organizations will remain the same. We will continue to select the best, most applicable outside sources for consumers who want to learn more about their condition.

New NCI Topics

Refer to the Tech Docs for a complete list of new and updated National Cancer Institute content.

New Medication Topics

Medication topics from Cerner Multum, Inc., are not included in all systems. Added topics may include new information and/or the addition of new drug names. Refer to the Tech Docs for a complete list of new and updated titles.

New Aisle 7 (CAM) Content

Refer to the Tech Docs for a complete list of new and updated Aisle 7 (CAM) content.

Updated Actionsets

A primary care physician or a specialist in the field reviewed the following topics. We verified all information for medical accuracy and added new medical information if available. While medically significant changes are listed here, minor revisions, such as editorial changes, may not be listed.

  • Click here to view an Actionset. Heart Problems: Living With an ICD: We added that if you or your partner are worried about resuming sex, talk with your doctor about your concerns. Your doctor or another health professional can give you support and advice.
  • Click here to view an Actionset. High Cholesterol: Making Lifestyle Changes: We have revised the focus of this actionset from lifestyle changes to raise your HDL level to lifestyle changes as part of the TLC Program to improve cholesterol levels.

A primary care physician or a specialist in the field reviewed the following topics. No medical revisions were needed.

Updated Decision Points

A primary care physician or a specialist in the field reviewed the following topics. We verified all information for medical accuracy and added new medical information if available. While medically significant changes are listed here, minor revisions, such as editorial changes, may not be listed.

  • Click here to view a Decision Point. Aortic Valve Stenosis: Should I Have Surgery?:

    Get the Facts: In "Is valve replacement the only treatment for aortic valve stenosis?" we now say that transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) might be an option for some people.

  • Click here to view a Decision Point. Cataracts: Should I Have Surgery?:

    Get the Facts: In "What are the risks of cataract surgery?" we now say that newer surgery techniques, such as using a laser for part of the surgery, make it less likely for problems to happen during or after surgery. In "What are the risks of not having cataract surgery?" we now say if you wait to get treatment until after the cataract has become severe, you may be more likely to have problems after surgery or have a slower recovery than someone who had surgery for a less severe cataract.

  • Click here to view a Decision Point. Heart Failure: Should I Get an Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator (ICD)?:

    Get the Facts: In "Who might want an ICD?" we now recommend that you talk with your doctor about the possibility of turning off the ICD at the end of life. We explain why someone might turn off the ICD and that it is a decision you make based on your values.

  • Click here to view a Decision Point. Statins: Should I Take Them?: We revised the information about test results, cardiovascular risk screening, and treatment options based on 2013 guidelines for cholesterol treatment from the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association.
  • Click here to view a Decision Point. HIV Testing: Should I Get Tested for Human Immunodeficiency Virus?:

    Get the Facts: Under "What is the test for HIV?" we added information about a rapid blood test that can detect both HIV antibodies and antigens.

  • Click here to view a Decision Point. HIV: When Should I Start Taking Antiretroviral Medicines for HIV Infection?:

    Get the Facts: We added dolutegravir as an example of an integrase inhibitor.

  • Click here to view a Decision Point. Testicular Cancer: Which Treatment Should I Have for Stage I Nonseminoma Testicular Cancer After My Surgery?: We now describe stage I nonseminoma cancer as low-risk or high-risk. We say that most experts agree that active surveillance is the preferred treatment for low-risk cancer. For high-risk cancer, experts disagree. Many recommend chemotherapy, some recommend surveillance, and a few recommend lymph node surgery. We say that surveillance carries the risk of radiation exposure from CT scans, and that if the cancer does come back, a higher dose of chemotherapy will be needed than if a man had chemotherapy soon after surgery. We revised the "Your Feelings" statements to reflect these updates.
  • Click here to view a Decision Point. Testicular Cancer: Which Treatment Should I Have for Stage I Seminoma Testicular Cancer After My Surgery?: We made changes to reflect the recommendation by many experts that active surveillance is the preferred treatment for stage I seminoma cancer. We say that radiation treatment is no longer considered routine treatment for stage I seminoma because of the serious side effects. We also say that the risks for surveillance include radiation exposure from CT scans. And we say that if the cancer does come back, a higher dose of radiation or chemotherapy will be needed. We revised the "Your Feelings" statements as part of this update.

A primary care physician or a specialist in the field reviewed the following topics. No medical revisions were needed.

Updated Health and Disease Topics

A primary care physician or a specialist in the field reviewed the following topics. We verified all information for medical accuracy and added new medical information if available. While medically significant changes are listed here, minor revisions, such as editorial changes, may not be listed.

  • Aldosterone Receptor Antagonists: Diuretics for Heart Failure: We now say that aldosterone receptor antagonists are used for heart failure instead of severe heart failure.
  • Antihistamines for Allergic Rhinitis: We added carbinoxamine (Karbinal) to the list of examples.
  • Aortic Valve Replacement: Minimally Invasive Methods: In the new section "Transcatheter valve replacement," we added details about the transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedure and who is eligible.
  • Aortic Valve Stenosis: We added that a minimally invasive procedure might be an option for some people who need an aortic valve replacement.
  • Arrhythmias and Sexual Activity: We added that if you or your partner are worried about resuming sex, talk with your doctor about your concerns. Your doctor or another health professional can give you support and advice.
  • Cataracts:
    • Surgery: We now say that your doctor may use a laser to help with part of the phacoemulsification surgery.
    • Cataracts in Children: We now say to call your child's doctor right away if you see that your child has one eye with a red reflex and one eye without it.
    • Intraocular Lens (IOL) Implants: We now describe toric IOLs and we suggest that you talk to your eye doctor about the pros and cons of each type of IOL.
  • Contact Lens Care: We added information on how to remove a contact lens that is stuck.
  • Diastolic Heart Failure: We added the term "heart failure with preserved ejection fraction."
  • Environmental Illness:
    • Toxic Chemicals in Our Environment: Under "Indoor air pollution," we added a list of three common indoor pollutants that have a great effect on health: formaldehyde, acrolein, and respirable particulates. We also added "Water pollution," a new section about keeping drinking water safe.
  • Esophageal Spasm: We now say that surgery is sometimes used in people who have a problem that affects the lower esophageal muscle (achalasia).
  • Fibromyalgia:
    • Exams and Tests: We revised the criteria used to diagnose fibromyalgia based on the 2010 American College of Rheumatology Preliminary Diagnostic Criteria for Fibromyalgia and Measurement of Symptom Severity. These criteria include widespread pain, the severity of other symptoms such as fatigue, and symptoms that have lasted for more than 3 months.
  • Giardiasis: We now say that you can get this infection if you swallow contaminated water while you swim.
    • Hand-Washing: We have updated this document based on the latest CDC recommendations.
  • Gluten-Free Diet for Celiac Disease: We added this statement: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) says that if a food sold in the U.S. is labeled free of gluten, then it must contain less than 20 parts per million (ppm) of gluten.
  • Growth and Development, Ages 1 to 12 Months:
  • Growth and Development, Ages 2 to 5 Years: We revised "Getting ready for kindergarten" based on Common Core Standards.
  • Health Screening: Finding Health Problems Early:
    • Cervical Cancer Screening: We now say that women ages 30 to 64 are encouraged to get a HPV test at the same time as a Pap test.
    • Heart Attack and Stroke Risk Screening: We revised the information based on 2013 guidelines for cardiovascular risk assessment from the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association.
  • Heart Failure
    • Other Treatment: We added fish oil supplements as a potential additional medicine.
  • Heart Failure and Sexual Activity: We added more recommendations on how to make sex easier on your heart such as be well rested before having sex and try other ways to be intimate that don't make your heart work so hard. We added that counseling with a health professional can help you resume sexual activity.
  • High Cholesterol: We revised the information about test results, cardiovascular risk screening, and treatment options based on 2013 guidelines for cholesterol treatment from the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association.
    • Heart Attack and Stroke Risk Screening: We revised the information based on 2013 guidelines for cardiovascular risk assessment from the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association.
    • Cholesterol Treatment Guidelines: We revised the information about test results, cardiovascular risk screening, and treatment options based on 2013 guidelines for cholesterol treatment from the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association.
  • Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection:
    • Exams and Tests: We added information about a rapid blood test that can detect both HIV antibodies and antigens, which allows an HIV infection to be found earlier than was possible in the past.
    • Medications: We added dolutegravir to the list of integrase inhibitor examples.
  • Lifestyle Changes That May Help Prevent Cancer: We now say that your doctor may recommend other things, like taking aspirin. But since taking aspirin can have risks, talk to your doctor about what tips are best for you.
  • Resuming Sexual Activity After a Heart Attack: We added more recommendations about resuming sex such as starting with ways of being intimate that are easy on your heart like kissing and caressing. We added a recommendation to call 911 for symptoms of a heart attack. We added that counseling may help with problems.
  • Rosacea: In "How is it treated?" we now include brimonidine with the skin cream medicines for treating redness and breakouts.
  • Rotator Cuff Disorders:
    • Rotator Cuff Repair: We now say that arthroscopic surgery is the most common way that this surgery is done.
  • Serotonin Antagonists (5-HT3 Receptor Antagonists): Per the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) alert, we now say that taking ondansetron may increase the risk for a very rare but serious condition called serotonin syndrome.
  • Sex and Your Heart: We added that sex is part of a healthy life. We added that a doctor or other health professional can provide counseling.
  • Stroke Rehabilitation: We added that a patient may have questions or concerns about having sex again and that rehab may provide help and support.
  • Uterine Fibroids: We added ulipristal, a medicine that is used to the treat moderate to severe symptoms of fibroids in women who are planning to have surgery.
  • Vasodilators for Heart Failure: We removed nitroglycerin as an example.

A primary care physician or a specialist in the field reviewed the following topics. No medical revisions were needed.

Updated Illustrations, iTools, and Online Forms

Updated Interactive Health Tools

A primary care physician or a specialist in the field reviewed the following topics. No medical revisions were needed.

Updated Medical Test Topics

A primary care physician or a specialist in the field reviewed the following topics. We verified all information for medical accuracy and added new medical information if available. While medically significant changes are listed here, minor revisions, such as editorial changes, may not be listed.

A primary care physician or a specialist in the field reviewed the following topics. No medical revisions were needed.

Updated Symptom Topics

A primary care physician or a specialist in the field reviewed the following topics. We verified all information for medical accuracy and added new medical information if available. While medically significant changes are listed here, minor revisions, such as editorial changes, may not be listed.

A primary care physician or a specialist in the field reviewed the following topics. No medical revisions were needed.

Updated NCI Topics

Refer to the Tech Docs for a complete list of updated National Cancer Institute content.

Updated Medication Topics

Medication topics from Cerner Multum, Inc. are not included in all systems. Updates may include new information and/or the addition of new drug names. Refer to your product Tech Docs for a complete list of new and updated titles.

Topic Title Changes, Topic Replacements, Medical Guideline Reviews

Topic title changes

Topic replacements

We archived the following searchable topics, and we name the replacement topics below. We also archived many rank-3 frames, which are non-searchable documents, because they contained duplicate information. See your product Tech Docs for a complete list of archived documents.

Medical guideline reviews

The following medical guidelines have been reviewed to ensure Healthwise content is accurate, consistent, and helpful to consumers.

  • American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (2013). 2013 guideline on the assessment of cardiovascular risk: A report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines.
  • American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (2013). 2013 guideline on the treatment of blood cholesterol to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk in adults: A report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines.
  • American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association (2013). Guideline for the management of heart failure: A report of the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology Foundation Task Force on Practice Guidelines.
  • Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) (2013). Global strategy for the diagnosis, management, and prevention of COPD

What's Next

New Topics

Topics on the following subjects are in development and are expected to release within the next 6 months:

  • Partner Support During Pregnancy

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